Dogs Good for You in Many Ways

Dogs are not only cozy companions — They also have a positive impact on your health. Studies have shown that owning a pet can help you cope with stress, prevent asthma in children, lower blood pressure, and boost your immune system. One of the main reasons why dogs are good for your health is that they encourage you to be more physically active. Whether you walk them, play with them, or take them to the park, dogs can help you burn calories and strengthen your heart. A recent study found that older dog owners walked an extra 23 minutes per day and took 2,760 more steps than non-owners. Another benefit of having a dog is that they can keep you active even during the cold and dark winter months.

A new study in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health examined the activity levels of 3,123 people between the ages of 49 and 91. About 20% of them had a dog, and they all wore a device that measured their movements for a week. The study found that people without a dog were more likely to be sedentary for about 30 minutes longer per day than those who had a dog. The study also found that dog owners were more active on bad weather days than non-owners were on good weather days. The researchers were surprised by these findings and said that dog walkers were more physically active and spent less time sitting on the coldest, wettest, and darkest days than non-dog owners were on long, sunny, and warm summer days.

Dogs are more than furry friends — they also improve your health in many ways. Research has shown that owning a pet can help you deal with stress, prevent asthma in children, lower blood pressure, and strengthen your immune system. One of the main reasons why dogs are good for your health is that they make you move more. Whether you walk them, play with them, or take them to the park, dogs can help you burn calories and keep your heart healthy. A recent study found that older dog owners walked an extra 23 minutes per day and took 2,760 more steps than non-owners. Another benefit of having a dog is that they can motivate you to stay active even during the cold and dark winter months.

A new study in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health examined the activity levels of 3,123 people between the ages of 49 and 91. About 20% of them had a dog, and they all wore a device that measured their movements for a week. The study found that people without a dog were more likely to be sedentary for about 30 minutes longer per day than those who had a dog. The study also found that dog owners were more active on bad weather days than non-owners were on good weather days. The researchers were surprised by these findings and said that dog walkers were more physically active and spent less time sitting on the coldest, wettest, and darkest days than non-dog owners were on long, sunny, and warm summer days. Andy Jones, a UEA professor and the project lead, said that this finding could have important implications for how to encourage people to stay active as they age. He suggested that finding an activity that you enjoy, such as walking a dog, could help you overcome the barriers of bad weather and lack of motivation. He also recommended adding muscle-strengthening exercises to your routine, hydrating well, and eating a balanced diet to support your physical activity.